3 Reasons the CEO Should Set the Tone for the Cloud Contact Center

Does your CEO fully support the investment in customer service? It’s a complex question as every company leader may claim the customer is important, but whether or not he or she supports the concept in practice is evidenced by the dollars spent. If the cloud contact center is nothing more than two people and a phone, one may not buy that the customer experience is important to company leadership.

The larger the company, the harder it is for the CEO to have a pulse on the customer experience. Still, it’s important for it to be a priority, even in the C-suite as the buy-in and investment at that level can make or break the competitive advantage. What follows are three key elements that need to apply within an environment where the cloud contact center is in use.

It shouldn’t be a cost center

It’s easy to assume that the cloud contact center or customer service division is nothing more than a cost center. We often fail to make the connection between the customer interaction and long-term revenue opportunities. At the same time, these interactions also protect revenue. An estimated $41 billion is lost by U.S. companies each year due to poor customer service, according to NewVoiceMedia. A report by Bain & Company shows that increasing customer retention by just 5 percent can increase profits by 25 percent to 95 percent, suggesting the customer service department is anything but a cost center.

It is a key differentiator

Whether you’re doing it right or wrong, your approach to customer service will set you apart from the competition as either good or bad. Zappos is one company that continues to be the focus whenever the quality customer service experience is discussed. The online retailer prioritizes quality customer care above all else and it shows in their performance. Likewise, Amazon continues to dominate because CEO Jeff Bezos believes the quality customer experience matters.

It requires an investment in the right people and resources

It’s not enough to develop a customer service policy – you have to have the right people, tools and other resources in place to put that policy into action. A recent Gallup State of the American Workplace report suggested that a 240 percent boost in performance-related business outcomes was possible when organizations successfully engaged both their employees and their customers. This focus is critical and it must be led by the CEO.

Markets today are saturated with providers and consumers have a wide variety of choices when it comes to the companies with which they want to do business. The quality customer experience has to be a demonstrated priority from the top-down or consumers will take their business elsewhere.

By Susan J. Campbell for cloudcontactcenterzone.com